Hanks champions shocking yank tank

February 20, 2007

The fate of the electric car has been a tortured one. At the height of it’s glory, in the early 20th century, electric cars outnumbered their gas guzzling counterparts.

Celebrity Tom Hanks has always been a supporter of the electric car as an environmentally friendly, technological alternative to the petrol guzzling smog producing yank tank, investing in a company that converts hybrid cars to electric cars.

Hank can now charge around in his electric Scion XB, having paid $55K to have it converted so it could run between 140-180 miles at 95mph without being re-charged. http://www.ecorazzi.com/?p=1584

There are obvious added bonuses for a celebrity desirous of avoiding having to stop at a gas station, and the unwanted encounters with the public and paparazzi.

Hanks admits that an affordable electric car is three to five years away, and is financing the sale of more economically friendly affordable alternatives for mainstream motorists.

The advent of mass manufacturing in the early 20th century, coupled with an abundance of oil and the convenience of an automatic starter killed early electric dreams.

Electric cars came back with a buzz, charged with new ambitions and equipped with better technology. However big corporate automobile companies and their political beneficiaries have conspired against them.

At every opportunity they have tried to kill the ‘electric dream’, not just through negative PR campaigns about their limitations, but in the vain but misguided hope that literally crushing the electric cars, and disposing of their carcuses, would send them into oblivion.

Meanwhile investment company Mubadala are working with French group Dassault to produce an electric car operating on cleaner power at speeds of up to 160km per hour using 1.5 litres of petrol per 100km.

 http://www.arabianbusiness.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8223

Although Ford and GM have showcased their designs for an environmentally friendly car, skeptics believe that the big car manufacturers lack of openness about their technological capabilities is part of a broader commercial strategy.

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